Recently on Purl Soho’s blog, Purl Bee, they listed instructions for a lap duvet which is so simple and so satiating to make that I recommend it to absolutely everyone!

On my trip to New York I bought similar Nani Iro Pocho and Saa Saa fabric for my own, and I put it together with surprising ease! It was my first time using a recycled batting (made from plastic bottles!) and it was very smooth to use and soft in the final product. If you can find wool batting like they use in the tutorial, however, I would use that. The mid to high-loft is very important in the fluffiness of your duvet!

My only kerfuffle was in the washing of the fabric! The double-weave Pocho fabric didn’t like being pre-washed! It unraveled a good 1/2″ on both sides, and the tacking between layers puckered, which didn’t like being ironed out either. Molly, on the Purl Bee blog, recommends washing it after you sew it all together so that it puckers the duvet more, but I’m not too sure about that. Let me know if you try this and what you decide about washing.

Instead of the tacking of the quilt on the sewing machine, as Molly suggests, I hand-quilted a border on a few of the dots on the fabric. I really like the effect- but it took a long time!

Overall, I’m in love with this duvet, and I’m sure I’ll be making more for friends. As I told my NY friend, this project is all about honoring the fabric you love- ’cause in essence, that’s all it is- just two big fluffy pieces of fabric. ~long sigh~

P.S. May I please recommend “Alice Waters and Chez Panisse” as a must read for any foodies out there? It’s a great book about the best restaurant in America and its struggle to financially succeed. Alice Waters is, in my opinion, a great role model when it comes to fighting for what you believe in. I hope I’ve acquired even a small amount of her perseverance after reading this biography.

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